Deconstruction

Current Deconstruction:

Volunteers Needed

Volunteers, Student Clubs, and Organizations Needed !!!! Deconstruction of One or More Houses.
Deconstruction is the dismantling of a structure in the reverse of its construction in order to salvage as much of the materials as possible in a cost-effective and safe manner. Work will take place during weekends in January, February, March, 2001. Conducted by the UF Powell Center for Construction and Environment, De-Construction provides an unique opportunity to see how buildings go together, by taking them apart, to gain experience with a job-site environment, and to help protect the natural environment and serve the community, by making materials available for reuse. You will be expected to participate in a 2-hour orientation, sign a waiver of liability, and own steel-toed boots. All other equipment and tools will be provided. CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE PREFERRED, NOT REQUIRED.

De·con·struc·tion:

  1. The dismantling of a structure in the reverse of its construction in order to salvage as much of the materials as possible.
  2. Help protect the natural environment by keeping valuable materials out of landfills.
  3. See how buildings go together, by taking them apart.

The salvaged materials will be available for reuse in a new affordable house construction project for the Alachua County Housing Authority.


DECONSTRUCTION DAYS!!!

During Spring Break: March 3 – March 10th We can deconstruct on Wednesday-Friday during Spring Break if enough people participate.

During that week, including the two weekends, free lunches will be provided, and the famous Powell Center for Construction and Environment Deconstruction t-shirt will be given to each participant!!

If you are able to work during the Spring Break holiday, please let me know which days you will be available.

Saturdays after Spring Break: March 17, March 24, April 14, April 21, April 28

If you are interested, please provide your name and telephone number to: Brad Guy, Powell Center for Construction and Environment, Tel: 392-7502, e-mail: minou@grove.ufl.edu, Room ARC 160.

Please note: You will be expected to participate in a 2-hour orientation, sign a waiver of liability, and own steel-toed boots. All other equipment and tools will be provided.


Past Deconstruction:

Ft. Campbell Deconstruction Analysis

Description: During May, June, and July of 2002, Fort Campbell, KY made 20,000 to 25,000 square feet of surplus World War II wood-framed buildings available for this pilot deconstruction project. The Austin, Texas Habitat for Humanity affiliate, with labor provided by teams of Americorps volunteers, deconstructed 5 buildings at Ft. Campbell. The University of Florida’s Powell Center for Construction and Environment (PCCE) was onsite to provide supervision and guidance and to collect and evaluate data describing deconstruction duration, deconstruction cost, and quantities of recovered materials.


Implementing Deconstruction in Florida: Materials Reuse Issues, Disassembly Techniques & Policy (FCSHWM)

Description: Analyze the issues related to the feasibility of replacing demolition and land filling of building materials with deconstruction and reuse. This project will provide recommendations to state and local governments, demolition companies and secondary material companies on how to accomplish the shift towards this environmentally preferable alternative.


Building Deconstruction: Reuse and Recycling of C&D Waste (FL DEP Innovative Recycling Projects Grants Program)

Description: Will target ten wood framed residential buildings in Alachua County, Florida for deconstruction and reuse or redistribution of the salvaged materials. The project field data and background research conducted during the project will be used to develop strategies for the implementation of deconstruction on a long-term basis in Alachua County.


Building Materials Recovery Project Photos


The Center Playhouse

Description: The Powell Center for Construction and Environment (PCCE) recently demonstrated the potential utility and natural beauty of deconstructed building material for reuse in a new structure. A children’s playhouse using these materials was crafted in July 1999 to benefit the Children’s Expo Museum of Gainesville in their annual fundraising raffle. Local building contractors and a building construction school also submitted playhouses to the raffle.